The B/W Documentary   Amy has lived and worked in the developing world both as a subject for her work and artistic expression. Initially, she was striving to deconstruct the colonial gaze, and its sidekick, economic imperialism, to recreate images about otherness to images about humanity and its quotidian dignity. The intent was to capture these images through the window of etho-cultural understanding to relate differently with the subjects [other than as a tourist or reporter] and to be able to penetrate further.

The B/W Documentary

Amy has lived and worked in the developing world both as a subject for her work and artistic expression. Initially, she was striving to deconstruct the colonial gaze, and its sidekick, economic imperialism, to recreate images about otherness to images about humanity and its quotidian dignity. The intent was to capture these images through the window of etho-cultural understanding to relate differently with the subjects [other than as a tourist or reporter] and to be able to penetrate further.

The Urban Landscapes  She continues to focus on liminal space, the [different kind of] emerging world of our habitat, as reasserting the political and contested character of social space. Landscapes become my new face of social space.  Urban environments are rife with these isolated places, not necessarily limited to the interiors, but extensions of them: rooftops, peripheral highways and waterways, side streets, etc. Via the latest landscape images, she now refines a different mode of interpretation of this urban isolationism, which can be argued is at the root of both economic and social poverty. It is also a place for escape, hope and emptiness simultaneously, in these urban peripheries. Shot at twilight, where the timing and solitude — coupled with auspicious light — emphasizes these issues she addresses. There is no artifice of the interior collapsing with the exterior, but the landscape serves as an extension of the interior, perhaps more indicative of urbanity that those spaces more cosmetically constructed. 

The Urban Landscapes

She continues to focus on liminal space, the [different kind of] emerging world of our habitat, as reasserting the political and contested character of social space. Landscapes become my new face of social space.  Urban environments are rife with these isolated places, not necessarily limited to the interiors, but extensions of them: rooftops, peripheral highways and waterways, side streets, etc. Via the latest landscape images, she now refines a different mode of interpretation of this urban isolationism, which can be argued is at the root of both economic and social poverty. It is also a place for escape, hope and emptiness simultaneously, in these urban peripheries. Shot at twilight, where the timing and solitude — coupled with auspicious light — emphasizes these issues she addresses. There is no artifice of the interior collapsing with the exterior, but the landscape serves as an extension of the interior, perhaps more indicative of urbanity that those spaces more cosmetically constructed. 

The Earth Series  Moving this concept further, the more representative Earth Series complements the urban landscapes, sometime shot from the surface of the subject, sometimes aerially from helicopters to give greater overview of its expanse.  All these images focus on the converse, the opposite, of urbanity and its subsequent destruction in order to empathize the increasing vortex of movement to urban centers.  These images act as a preservation of the world that is inevitably disintegrating through the proliferation of mankind on its world’s surface.  It is not a condemnation of this progress, but a documentation of what is lost to us as our world morphs in both form and color under the duress of industry and development.

The Earth Series

Moving this concept further, the more representative Earth Series complements the urban landscapes, sometime shot from the surface of the subject, sometimes aerially from helicopters to give greater overview of its expanse.  All these images focus on the converse, the opposite, of urbanity and its subsequent destruction in order to empathize the increasing vortex of movement to urban centers.  These images act as a preservation of the world that is inevitably disintegrating through the proliferation of mankind on its world’s surface.  It is not a condemnation of this progress, but a documentation of what is lost to us as our world morphs in both form and color under the duress of industry and development.

The Voyage Series  This series represents an abstract departure into visualization of travel as it feels from the more personal view of one traveling, not only between the spheres of urbanity to more remote spaces, but also in a way that captures contemporary urban travel from one center to another. Being photographed on the surface of this earth, typically by train, the colors of the earth swirling past reflect the evolution and increase of the speed of travel, which has inexorably led to the urbanization of our world.

The Voyage Series

This series represents an abstract departure into visualization of travel as it feels from the more personal view of one traveling, not only between the spheres of urbanity to more remote spaces, but also in a way that captures contemporary urban travel from one center to another. Being photographed on the surface of this earth, typically by train, the colors of the earth swirling past reflect the evolution and increase of the speed of travel, which has inexorably led to the urbanization of our world.

 

©2017 Amy K Boyd Photography